) Compare and contrast nominal dichotomous ordinal and normal variables. B) In social science research why isn’t it important to distinguish between interval and ratio data?

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) Compare and contrast nominal dichotomous ordinal and normal variables. B) In social science research why isn’t it important to distinguish between interval and ratio data?

For which variables identified as scale is the skewness statistic more than 1.00 or less than 1.00? b) Why is this answer important? C) Does this agree with the boxplot in Output 4.2? Explain your answer.

 

Instructions: Variables Z Scores Population and Output DB 820

Answer the short-answer questions below. The answers must demonstrate course-related knowledge and assertions must be supported with scholarly citations (minimum of ) in the 7th APA (A MUST) edition format. Minimum word count for all short answers cumulatively is 250 words.

Refer to the chapters attached (mainly chapters -4) and Keller’s Part II section.

Do NOT retype the questions. Use only the number of the question (i.e.: D2.1 then the answer)

INSERT SHORT ANSWER TO THE QUESTION LISTED BELOW

Respond to the following short answer questions from Morgan Leech Gloeckner & Barrett textbook:

D2.1 Working with Variables.

  1. a) Compare and contrast nominal dichotomous ordinal and normal variables. B) In social science research why isn’t it important to distinguish between interval and ratio data?

D2.2 z scores and the population.

  1. a) How do z scores relate to the normal curve? b) How would you
    interpret a z score of ‐.0? c) What percentage of scores is between a z of ‐2 and a z of +2? Why is this important?

D2. Interpreting Output 4.1b.

  1. a) For which variables identified as scale is the skewness statistic more than 1.00 or less than ‐00? b) Why is this answer important? C) Does this agree with the boxplot in Output 4.2? Explain your answer.

D2.4 Interpreting Output 4.4.

  1. a) Can you interpret the means? Explain your answer. b) How many participants are there all together? c) How many have complete data (nothing missing)? d) What percentage are male? e) What percentage took algebra?

References (in additional to the scholarly articles you must include the following)

Morgan G. Leech N. Gloeckner G. Barrett K. (201). IBM SPSS for Introductory Statistics. (5th Ed.). New York NY